Category Archives: Rotary Club of Winter Springs

Rotary Club of Winter Springs Florida

30th Annual Winter Springs Rotary Golf Classic

30th Annual Winter Springs Rotary Golf Classic
The Rotary Club of Winter Springs
All net proceeds to local charities!

Tuscawilla Country Club
Monday, September 15, 2014
Registration: 11:00 AM
Shotgun Start Tee Time: 12:30 PM; 4-person scramble

Golf, Driving Range, Prizes, FREE Beverages on the course, lunch & dinner, Bogey is max, No mulligans , Plenty of Surprises … Plenty of Fun!!
Music by the Winter Springs High School Band, Celebrities
Orlando Magic’s Pat Williams will be receiving the Rotary “Service Above Self” Award

Sponsorships:

  • Title: $5,000 - Plaque for office, sign, 1 minute commercial at lunch, introduction at opening; two foursomes; allowed to display banners and ads at registration and location; mentioned in all mailings; program cover
  • Corporate: $1,500 - Plaque for office, one foursome, sign, name in program; interactive hole
  • Beverage: $500 per cart - Plaque for office, sign on cart
  • Breakfast: $1,000 - Plaque for office, banners allowed on walls
  • Lunch: $1,000 - Plaque for office, banners allowed on walls
  • Souvenir Gift (minimum 150 to be supplied): $1,000 
  • Foursome & Sign: $500
  • Sign: $100
  • Interactive Hole: $250 Company table at hole
  • Other fun stuff – to be determined

Individual Entry: $110 / Max 120 players – 30 foursomes

Name:____________________________________________________

Company Name:____________________________________________

E-mail: ___________________________________________________

Address: _________________________________________________

City:____________________________________ State: ____ Zip: ___

Best Phone Number: _________________________________________

Names:
1. _______________________________________________________

2. _______________________________________________________

3. _______________________________________________________

4. ______________________________________________________

E-mail to:
ppartyka@realvest.com

Mail Payment to:
Rotary Club of Winter Springs
PO BOX 195235
Winter Springs, FL 32708

Golf Committee :

  • Chair-Paul P Partyka (407-341-0805)
  • Gerry Marino (407-376-7536)
  • Gary Grund (407-585-0217)
  • Roger Owen (407-222-7425)
  • Jim Fry (407-366-8681)
  • Andy Brunkala (407-467-4982)
  • Denise McKinley (407-625-0635)
  • Jerry Smith (407-496-2927)

 

30th Annual Winter Springs Rotary Golf Classic Registration Form

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Meetings

 The Rotary Club of Winter Springs meets at the Tuskawilla Country Club on Friday mornings.  Enjoy networking and breakfast starting at 7:00 am, with the meeting starting promptly at 7:30 am.

tuskawillaThe Tuskawilla Country Club is located at 1500 Winter Springs Blvd., Winter Springs, Florida 32708   mapPlease  contact us  for more information.

MEETING CALENDAR

Officers and Directors 2014-2015


President
Gary Grund

Secretary/PR

Denise McKinley
Tresurer Greg Smith

President-Elect Scott Wittmer
Immediate Past President/Vice President Andy Brunkala
Sergeant-at-Arms Gerry Marino 
Director
Henry Gerrity
Director Gerry Marino
Director Scott Nickerson
Director Paul Partyka
Director 
Director
Bart Phillips
Mark Sardo
District Governor:
(AREA 12)
Jo Weber

 

 

 

Weekly Rotary Photos

We are proud to have our own “in house” photographer. Rick Edison takes amazing photos at most every Rotary event.

Click here to view the latest photos from Rotary events.

Keeth Rotary Run

The Rotary Club of Winter Springs lead by Rotarian Tim Seibert host the annual Keeth Rotary Run which is held at Keeth Elementary School in Winter Springs.

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Registration started early.

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Rotarian Roger Owen was working hard registering kids.

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Some of the many Winter Springs Rotarians who participated in this event.

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Ton’s of awards.

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Starting line

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The Winners!

Pathways to Care

The Rotary Club of Winter Springs lead by Rotarian Harry Arthur feeds the residents of Pathways to Care on the first Sunday of every month.

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We start at 6:00am and prepare breakfast for the 40 +- residents. After serving breakfast we clean up and start on preparing lunch. Once lunch is served and cleaned up we prepare dinner which is usually a light meal, usually soup and sandwiches.

For more information about Pathways to Care in Casselberry, Florida click here:  Pathways to Care

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Guiding Principles

The Object of Rotary

The Object of Rotary is to encourage and foster the ideal of service as a basis of worthy enterprise and, in particular, to encourage and foster:

  • FIRST. The development of acquaintance as an opportunity for service;
  • SECOND. High ethical standards in business and professions, the recognition of the worthiness of all useful occupations, and the dignifying of each Rotarian’s occupation as an opportunity to serve society;
  • THIRD. The application of the ideal of service in each Rotarian’s personal, business, and community life;
  • FOURTH. The advancement of international understanding, goodwill, and peace through a world fellowship of business and professional persons united in the ideal of service.

Avenues of Service

Based on the Object of Rotary, the Avenues of Service are Rotary’s philosophical cornerstone and the foundation on which club activity is based:

  • Club Service focuses on strengthening fellowship and ensuring the effective functioning of the club.
  • Vocational Service encourages Rotarians to serve others through their vocations and to practice high ethical standards.
  • Community Service covers the projects and activities the club undertakes to improve life in its community.
  • International Service encompasses actions taken to expand Rotary’s humanitarian reach around the globe and to promote world understanding and peace.

The Four-Way Test

The test, which has been translated into more than 100 languages, asks the following questions:

Of the things we think, say or do

  1. Is it the TRUTH?
  2. Is it FAIR to all concerned?
  3. Will it build GOODWILL and BETTER FRIENDSHIPS?
  4. Will it be BENEFICIAL to all concerned?

Mission

The mission of Rotary International, a worldwide association of Rotary clubs, is to provide service to others, to promote high ethical standards, and to advance world understanding, goodwill, and peace through its fellowship of business, professional, and community leaders.
Diversity and Rotary

Rotary International recognizes the value of diversity within individual clubs. Rotary encourages clubs to assess those in their communities who are eligible for membership, under existing membership guidelines, and to endeavor to include the appropriate range of individuals in their clubs. A club that reflects its community with regard to professional and business classification, gender, age, religion, and ethnicity is a club with the key to its future.
Moving toward the future

In 2001-02, Rotary International began developing a strategic plan to guide the organization as it entered its second century of service. In June 2007, the Board of Directors approved the RI Strategic Plan 2007-10, which identifies seven priorities:

  • Eradicate polio.
  • Advance the internal and external recognition and public image of Rotary.
  • Increase Rotary’s capacity to provide service to others.
  • Expand membership globally in both numbers and quality.
  • Emphasize Rotary’s unique vocational service commitment.
  • Optimize the use and development of leadership talents within RI.
  • Fully implement the strategic planning process to ensure continuity and consistency throughout the organization.

What is Rotary?

Rotary club members are business and professional leaders who volunteer in their communities and promote world understanding and peace. Rotary’s 31,000 clubs in more than 165 countries and regions encourage high ethical standards and carry out humanitarian projects to address such issues as poverty, health, hunger, education, and the environment.

Through more than $95 million in Rotary Foundation grants each year, Rotary clubs support community projects at home and abroad. Known as the world’s largest private provider of international education scholarships, The Rotary Foundation funds more than 1,000 students annually to study overseas and act as cultural ambassadors. Rotary also partners with eight prestigious universities around the globe to educate midcareer professionals in peace and conflict resolution.

PolioPlus is Rotary’s flagship program. Rotary club members will contribute $600 million and countless volunteer hours to help immunize over two billion children against polio by Rotary’s centennial in 2005. Spearheading partners in the Global Polio Eradication Initiative include the World Health Organization, Rotary International, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and UNICEF.

Founded in Chicago in 1905 as the world’s first volunteer service organization, Rotary quickly expanded around the globe. Clubs meet weekly for fellowship to discuss local and global topics. Clubs are nonreligious, nongovernmental, and open to every race, culture, and creed.

History of Rotary International

World’s First

The world’s first service club, the Rotary Club of Chicago, Illinois, USA, was formed on 23 February 1905 by Paul P. Harris, an attorney who wished to recapture in a professional club the same friendly spirit he had felt in the small towns of his youth. The name “Rotary” derived from the early practice of rotating meetings among members’ offices.

Rotary’s popularity spread throughout the United States in the decade that followed; clubs were chartered from San Francisco to New York. By 1921, Rotary clubs had been formed on six continents, and the organization adopted the name Rotary International a year later.

As Rotary grew, its mission expanded beyond serving the professional and social interests of club members. Rotarians began pooling their resources and contributing their talents to help serve communities in need. The organization’s dedication to this ideal is best expressed in its principal motto: Service Above Self. Rotary also later embraced a code of ethics, called The 4-Way Test, that has been translated into hundreds of languages.

International

During and after World War II, Rotarians became increasingly involved in promoting international understanding. In 1945, 49 Rotary members served in 29 delegations to the United Nations Charter Conference. Rotary still actively participates in UN conferences by sending observers to major meetings and promoting the United Nations in Rotary publications. Rotary International’s relationship with the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) dates back to a 1943 London Rotary conference that promoted international cultural and educational exchanges. Attended by ministers of education and observers from around the world, and chaired by a past president of RI, the conference was an impetus to the establishment of UNESCO in 1946.

Service

An endowment fund, set up by Rotarians in 1917 “for doing good in the world,” became a not-for-profit corporation known as The Rotary Foundation in 1928. Upon the death of Paul Harris in 1947, an outpouring of Rotarian donations made in his honor, totaling US$2 million, launched the Foundation’s first program — graduate fellowships, now called Ambassadorial Scholarships. Today, contributions to The Rotary Foundation total more than US$80 million annually and support a wide range of humanitarian grants and educational programs that enable Rotarians to bring hope and promote international understanding throughout the world.

In 1985, Rotary made a historic commitment to immunize all of the world’s children against polio. Working in partnership with nongovernmental organizations and national governments thorough its PolioPlus program, Rotary is the largest private-sector contributor to the global polio eradication campaign. Rotarians have mobilized hundreds of thousands of PolioPlus volunteers and have immunized more than one billion children worldwide. By the 2005 target date for certification of a polio-free world, Rotary will have contributed half a billion dollars to the cause.

Organization

As it approached the dawn of the 21st century, Rotary worked to meet the changing needs of society, expanding its service effort to address such pressing issues as environmental degradation, illiteracy, world hunger, and children at risk. The organization admitted women for the first time (worldwide) in 1989 and claims more than 145,000 women in its ranks today. Following the collapse of the Berlin Wall and the dissolution of the Soviet Union, Rotary clubs were formed or re-established throughout Central and Eastern Europe. Today, 1.2 million Rotarians belong to some 31,000 Rotary clubs in 166 countries.

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